Gramercy Park Consulting

I'm Simon te Brinke, a social business strategist and director of Gramercy Park Consulting (located in Perth, Western Australia). I work with corporate and government clients and develop innovative digital comms. and business strategies by blending new technologies with creative thinking and emerging digital channels including the web, mobile and social technologies. Contact stebrinke@gramercypark.com.au or +61 418 943 441 or on the tweet @GramercyPark. This is my blog :-) Views are mine.

How Apple Is Invading Our Bodies
This is new, and slightly unnerving. When technologies get adopted as fast as we tend to adopt Apple’s products, there are always unintended consequences. When the iPhone came out it was praised to the skies as a design and engineering marvel, because it is one, but no one really understood what it would be like to have it in our lives. Nobody anticipated the way iPhones exert a constant gravitational tug on our attention. Do I have e-mail? What’s happening on Twitter? Could I get away with playing Tiny Wings at this meeting? When you’re carrying a smartphone, your attention is never entirely undivided.
The reality of living with an iPhone, or any smart, connected device, is that it makes reality feel just that little bit less real. One gets over-connected, to the point where the thoughts and opinions of distant anonymous strangers start to feel more urgent than those of your loved ones who are in the same room as you. One forgets how to be alone and undistracted. Ironically enough experiences don’t feel fully real till you’ve used your phone to make them virtual—tweeted them or tumbled them or Instagrammed them or YouTubed them, and the world has congratulated you for doing so. Smartphones create needs we never had before, and were probably better off without.
The great thing about the Apple Watch is that it’s always there—you don’t even have to take it out of your bag to look at it, the way you would with an iPhone. But unlike an iPhone you can’t put the Apple Watch away either. It’s always with you. During the company’s press event the artist Banksy posted a drawing to his Twitter feed of an iPhone growing roots that strangle and sink into the wrist of the hand holding it. You can see where he was coming from. This is technology establishing a new beachhead. To wear a device as powerful as the Apple Watch makes you ever so slightly post-human.
What might post-humanity be like? The paradox of a wearable device is that it both gives you control and takes it away at the same time. Consider the watch’s fitness applications. They capture all data that your body generates, your heart and activity and so on, gathers it up and stores and returns it to you in a form you can use. Once the development community gets through apping it, there’s no telling what else it might gather. This will change your experience of your body. The wristwatch made the idea of not knowing what time it was seem bizarre; in five years it might seem bizarre not to know how many calories you’ve eaten today, or what your resting heart rate is.
But wearables also ask you to give up control. Your phone will start telling you what you should and shouldn’t eat and how far you should run. It’s going to get in between you and your body and mediate that relationship. Wearables will make your physical self visible to the virtual world in the form of information, an indelible digital body-print, and that information is going to behave like any other information behaves these days. It will be copied and circulated. It will go places you don’t expect. People will use that information to track you and market to you. It will be bought and sold and leaked—imagine a data-spill comparable to the recent iCloud leak, only with Apple Watch data instead of naked selfies.
The Apple Watch represents a redrawing of the map that locates technology in one place and our bodies in another. The line between the two will never be as easy to find again. Once you’re OK with wearing technology, the only way forward is inward: the next product launch after the Apple Watch would logically be the iMplant. If Apple succeeds in legitimizing wearables as a category, it will have successfully established the founding node in a network that could spread throughout our bodies, with Apple setting the standards. Then we’ll really have to decide how much control we want—and what we’re prepared to give up for it.
(Source: http://time.com/3318655/apple-watch-2/) View high resolution

How Apple Is Invading Our Bodies

This is new, and slightly unnerving. When technologies get adopted as fast as we tend to adopt Apple’s products, there are always unintended consequences. When the iPhone came out it was praised to the skies as a design and engineering marvel, because it is one, but no one really understood what it would be like to have it in our lives. Nobody anticipated the way iPhones exert a constant gravitational tug on our attention. Do I have e-mail? What’s happening on Twitter? Could I get away with playing Tiny Wings at this meeting? When you’re carrying a smartphone, your attention is never entirely undivided.

The reality of living with an iPhone, or any smart, connected device, is that it makes reality feel just that little bit less real. One gets over-connected, to the point where the thoughts and opinions of distant anonymous strangers start to feel more urgent than those of your loved ones who are in the same room as you. One forgets how to be alone and undistracted. Ironically enough experiences don’t feel fully real till you’ve used your phone to make them virtual—tweeted them or tumbled them or Instagrammed them or YouTubed them, and the world has congratulated you for doing so. Smartphones create needs we never had before, and were probably better off without.

The great thing about the Apple Watch is that it’s always there—you don’t even have to take it out of your bag to look at it, the way you would with an iPhone. But unlike an iPhone you can’t put the Apple Watch away either. It’s always with you. During the company’s press event the artist Banksy posted a drawing to his Twitter feed of an iPhone growing roots that strangle and sink into the wrist of the hand holding it. You can see where he was coming from. This is technology establishing a new beachhead. To wear a device as powerful as the Apple Watch makes you ever so slightly post-human.

What might post-humanity be like? The paradox of a wearable device is that it both gives you control and takes it away at the same time. Consider the watch’s fitness applications. They capture all data that your body generates, your heart and activity and so on, gathers it up and stores and returns it to you in a form you can use. Once the development community gets through apping it, there’s no telling what else it might gather. This will change your experience of your body. The wristwatch made the idea of not knowing what time it was seem bizarre; in five years it might seem bizarre not to know how many calories you’ve eaten today, or what your resting heart rate is.

But wearables also ask you to give up control. Your phone will start telling you what you should and shouldn’t eat and how far you should run. It’s going to get in between you and your body and mediate that relationship. Wearables will make your physical self visible to the virtual world in the form of information, an indelible digital body-print, and that information is going to behave like any other information behaves these days. It will be copied and circulated. It will go places you don’t expect. People will use that information to track you and market to you. It will be bought and sold and leaked—imagine a data-spill comparable to the recent iCloud leak, only with Apple Watch data instead of naked selfies.

The Apple Watch represents a redrawing of the map that locates technology in one place and our bodies in another. The line between the two will never be as easy to find again. Once you’re OK with wearing technology, the only way forward is inward: the next product launch after the Apple Watch would logically be the iMplant. If Apple succeeds in legitimizing wearables as a category, it will have successfully established the founding node in a network that could spread throughout our bodies, with Apple setting the standards. Then we’ll really have to decide how much control we want—and what we’re prepared to give up for it.

(Source: http://time.com/3318655/apple-watch-2/)

(Source: ervehea)

fastcompany:

Watch The Evolution Of The iPhone From The Original To The 6 In One GIF
The iPhone 6 is already in the palms of many of the people reading this right now, who are following these words on a satisfyingly large screen, setting off a thin and lightweight body almost like air in the hands. The new phone is a technological marvel—and, as this GIF makes clear, it’s merely the latest in the evolution of a technological marvel that began in the summer of 2007.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Watch The Evolution Of The iPhone From The Original To The 6 In One GIF

The iPhone 6 is already in the palms of many of the people reading this right now, who are following these words on a satisfyingly large screen, setting off a thin and lightweight body almost like air in the hands. The new phone is a technological marvel—and, as this GIF makes clear, it’s merely the latest in the evolution of a technological marvel that began in the summer of 2007.

Read More>

A fantastic example of a Customer Journey Map using the health insurance category as an example (via @jimtincher). View high resolution

A fantastic example of a Customer Journey Map using the health insurance category as an example (via @jimtincher).

"The Lonely Pixie Dust Chair." by @GramercyPark
Pic taken this week on Ngarluma people country near the East Harding River just outside of Roebourne, Western Australia. View high resolution

"The Lonely Pixie Dust Chair." by @GramercyPark

Pic taken this week on Ngarluma people country near the East Harding River just outside of Roebourne, Western Australia.

[PIC] The old skool Commodore 64! I especially loved loading/saving programmes to cassette tapes! View high resolution

[PIC] The old skool Commodore 64! I especially loved loading/saving programmes to cassette tapes!

(Source: fornaxvoid, via murketing)

[VID] DAQRI Smart Helmet: Origins

Why did we build DAQRI Smart Helmet? DAQRI’s executive team discusses the impetus, hardware features, software tools, and use cases of the DAQRI Smart Helmet. To learn more, please visit http://hardware.daqri.com/smarthelmet

Ultralite Powered by Tumblr | Designed by:Doinwork